Address: 173-B Tagore Town, Allahabad
Contact No: 0532-2468222, 7080632218
Email: devpadhealth@gmail.com

 


 

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Women's Health-Care


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Infertility
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Vaccination Mother & Baby


Why Should Pregnant Women Be Vaccinated

Many women may not realize that they are not up-to-date on their immunizations and are susceptible to diseases that can harm them or their unborn child. Pregnant women should talk to their doctors to figure out which vaccines they may need and whether they should get them during pregnancy or wait until after their child is born.
Vaccinations can help protect you and your baby from certain infections during pregnancy.
Vaccinations you get during pregnancy help keep your baby safe from infection during the first few months of life until he gets his own vaccinations.
Not all vaccinations are safe to get during pregnancy. Talk to your health care provider to make sure any vaccination you get is safe.
Make sure your vaccinations are up to date before you get pregnant.

• Are Vaccines Safe


All vaccines are tested for safety under the supervision of the FDA. The vaccines are checked for purity, potency and safety, and the FDA and CDC monitor the safety of each vaccine for as long as it is in use. Some people may be allergic to an ingredient in a vaccine, such as eggs in the influenza vaccine, and should not receive the vaccine until they have talked to their doctor.

Which Vaccines Can I Receive While I'm Pregnant

• Hepatitis B:


Pregnant women who are at high risk for this disease and have tested negative for the virus can receive this vaccine. It is used to protect the mother and baby against infection both before and after delivery. A series of three doses is required to have immunity. The 2nd and 3rd doses are given 1 and 6 months after the first dose.
Influenza (Inactivated):
This vaccine can prevent serious illness in the mother during pregnancy. All women who will be pregnant (any trimester) during the flu season should be offered this vaccine. Talk to your doctor to see if this applies to you. Tetanus/Diphtheria/Pertussis (Tdap):
Tdap is recommended during pregnancy, preferably between 27 and 36 weeks’ gestation, to protect baby from whooping cough. If not administered during pregnancy, Tdap should be administered immediately after the birth of your baby.

• Can a Vaccine Harm My Unborn Baby


A number of vaccines, especially live-virus vaccines, should not be given to pregnant women, because they may be harmful to the baby. (A live-virus vaccine is made using the live strains of a virus.) Some vaccines can be given to the mother in the second or third trimester of pregnancy, while others should only be administered either at least three months before or immediately after the baby is born.

• Vaccine Schedule Of Baby


The following list provides a suggested timetable. Although vaccine schedules can differ slightly, you can generally expect the following vaccines at the ages indicated below.
• Hepatitis B:
First dose: at birth
Second dose: 1 to 2 months
Third dose: 6 to 18 months
• Rotavirus:
First dose: 2 months
Second dose: 4 months
Third dose: 3 months. Depending on the type of rotavirus vaccine used, the third dose may be omitted.
Diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis (DTaP):
First dose: 2 months
Second dose: 4 months
Third dose: 6 months
Fourth dose: 15-18 months
• Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib):
First dose: 2 months
Second dose: 4 months
Third dose: 6 months
Fourth dose: 12-15 months
• Pneumococcal:
First dose: 2 months
Second dose: 4 months
Third dose: 6 months
Fourth dose: 12-15 months
• Polio
First dose: 2 months
Second dose: 4 months
Third dose: 6 to 18 months
• Influenza Two doses one month apart, then one dose every year starting at 6 months of age Measles/mumps/rubella (MMR)
First dose: 12-15 months
Varicella (chickenpox)
First dose: 12-15 months
• Hepatitis A
Two doses six months apart: 12-23 months
4 to 6 years of age
• Diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis (DTaP)
One booster dose: 4-6 years
• Polio
One booster dose: 4-6 years
Measles/mumps/rubella (MMR)
One booster dose: 4-6 years
Varicella (chickenpox)
One booster dose: 4-6 years
11 to 18 years of age
Tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis (Tdap)
One dose: 11-12 years
Human papillomavirus (HPV) First dose: 11-12 years
Second dose: 6-12 months after first dose
Note: Teens starting this vaccine at 15 years or older need three doses. The second dose should be given one to two months after the first dose, and the third dose should be given six to 12 months after the first dose.
• Meningococcal (ACWY)
First dose: 11-12 years
Second dose: 16-18 years
Note: Teens 16 to 18 years old and those starting college who did not have this vaccine previously should get one dose.
• Meningococcal (B)
First dose: 16-18 years
Second dose: At least six months after first dose
Note: In some situations, such as in outbreak scenarios and for immune-compromised teens, three doses will be recommended with the second dose administered one to two months after the first dose, and the third dose six months after the first dose. Talk to your child’s doctor if you have questions about the number of doses your child will need.



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Address: 173-B Tagore Town, Allahabad
Contact No: 0532-2468222, 7080632218
Email: devpadhealth@gmail.com